Research Articles

Safety of SSRIs in Pregnancy

Image credit: tipstimes.com/pregnancy

doi:10.7244/cmj.2013.07.003
Sian-Lee Ewan

A recent study, Jensen et al 2013 [1], sought to differentiate the effects of exposure to maternal depression from the effects of antidepressants in their contribution to a reduction of Apgar scores. They collected data regarding diagnosis of depression, use of antidepressants in pregnancy, and Apgar scores at 5 minutes from all pregnancies in Denmark from 1996 to 2006 using national databases. This gave information on 668,144 births. Pregnant women were divided into 8 risk groups depending on their exposure to antidepressants during pregnancy, their exposure to antidepressants before pregnancy, and a diagnosis of depression before the end of pregnancy. Logistic regression analyses were applied with Apgar score <7 as the outcome and risk group as the variable of interest. Apgar score of <7 at 5 minutes was used as the outcome because it has been associated with an increased risk of low IQ at age 18, individuals being less likely to have no income from work, and neurological disability [1]

Medical Students concerned regarding lack of research skill teaching

Image credit: Bryan Jones

doi:10.7244/cmj-1373989392
F Cooksey, R Smith, TI Lemon, R Sharm, A Yarrow Jenkins, P Winter, A Buick

Knowledge of research skills and methods, once an integral part of the academic process, has in recent times become neglected by medical schools. Anecdotal evidence suggests political pressures have prioritised communication skills training as the focus towards producing the best doctors for tomorrow. Consequently, the prioritisation of communication training in the UK undergraduate curriculum has caused a reduction in research methods training, despite Tomorrows Doctors (2009) [1] documenting research skills such as critical appraisal integral to the analytical armoury of the developing clinician. We decided to poll students as to whether they felt they are adequately taught research skills and methods in their undergraduate medical courses.

Short-term vs Conventional Glucocorticoid Therapy in Acute Exacerbations of COPD

Image credit: Hey Paul Studios

doi:10.7244/cmj.2013.07.002
Christine Ma

Three hundred and fourteen patients >40 years old with >20 pack year history and diagnosed acute exacerbation of COPD in hospital were randomised to have either 5 or 14 days of systemic glucocorticoids. The primary end point of this study was the time to next exacerbation over a follow-up period of 6 months, and secondary end points examined all-cause mortality, changes in pulmonary function testing, clinical performance, glucocorticoid-associated adverse events. Apart from a higher cumulative glucocorticoid exposure in the 14 day therapy group, there were no statistical differences in primary or secondary outcome measures between the two groups.

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