All articles

Dengue in India: The importance of child education

doi:10.7244/cmj.2016.05.001
M Roshen

Dengue is an important mosquito-borne viral disease and constitutes a major public health concern throughout tropical and subtropical regions. Its global incidence has increased 30-fold in the past half century and the World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates that there are up to 100 million new infections annually, with 40% of the world’s population at risk.

Historical Figures in Neuroscience: Donald Hebb

Image Credit: Raymond M. Klein

doi:10.7244/cmj.2016.02.002
J Kang

Donald Olding Hebb is truly a historical figure in the field of neuroscience, neurology and psychology. Hebb’s work, in particular his monograph The Organization of Behavior: A Neuropsychological Theory, provided a biological explanation for numerous psychological phenomena and revolutionized the aforementioned fields, a feat emphasized by his consequent nomination for the 1965 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine. However, what distinguishes Hebb from other exceptional scientists is that his influence is not solely limited to his research. His work as an educator inspired many prominent psychologists, including Brenda Milner, Ronald Melzack and Michael Posner, and stimulated changes in educational approaches, most notably in the childhood education of the underprivileged.

Antimicrobial resistance: A major threat to public health

Credit: Wellcome Images

doi:10.7244/cmj.2016.01.001
WL Hamilton and R Wenlock

Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) is an increasing problem in the treatment of many pathogenic microorganisms, and can be intrinsic to the pathogen or acquired. Here, we provide an overview of the causes and consequences of AMR using illustrations from bacterial species that have a major impact on UK healthcare, such as Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Extended-Spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing organisms, and Carbapenemase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE). Bacteria can quickly evolve AMR due to short generation times allowing rapid evolutionary change, and horizontal transfer of genetic material between strains. The resulting arms race between bacterial evolution and human pharmaceuticals is one that modern medicine is currently losing, with potentially disastrous consequences for patient outcomes, public health, and healthcare macroeconomics.

CMJ Photo Competition - Winner announced!

I miss the NHS

The CMJ are pleased to annouce the winner of the 2015 photo competition as Roisin O'Dea. We had a high number of excellent entries and it was difficult to pick just the one. We will be uploading the runner up images shortly. Click to view the winning entry.

Acute skin toxicities in patients receiving adjuvant breast radiotherapy

Credit: IAEA Imagebank

doi:10.7244/cmj.2015.08.002
P Boothroyd, E Lee , E Sweet, A Stillie, E Cameron, Y Cao, A MacArthur, H Zakaria, J Cameron

Adjuvant breast radiotherapy (RT) is associated with acute skin toxicities including erythema and desquamation that may be associated with a detrimental impact on patients’ quality of life. Management of radiation-induced skin reactions (RISR) is contentious due to conflicting literature. There is a lack of evidence for the use of aqueous cream although this is commonly used in UK cancer centres. Alternative preparations such as Moogoo udder cream® are more expensive and may be more efficacious. The aim of this study was to investigate patient experience of RISRs and determine whether they would be willing to purchase a cream not provided on the NHS, should one be demonstrated to be more efficacious.

Patient Information: One Approach Fits All?

doi:10.7244/cmj.2015.08.001
R Price, R Gilhespy, K Hartop, S Jack, E Simpson, A Stillie

The evolution of healthcare spans centuries and reflects the way in which new knowledge has been applied and subsequently integrated into medical practice. There has been a distinct shift towards a mutualistic approach to delivering healthcare. Physicians must address increasingly complex patient expectations and ensure that patients understand their medical conditions. Providing solely verbal information has long been recognised to result in poor patient recall1, however identifying and developing a model to ensure the effective delivery of medical information is proving more challenging. Can one approach fit all?

Fatigue: let's talk about it

doi:10.7244/cmj.2015.06.002
RL Lambson

Chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) is a debilitating condition characterised by intense long-lasting fatigue and affects 0.2-2% UK population. In addition, a more significant burden to UK health is the fatigue is commonly associated with many chronic diseases. Over 17.5 million people within the UK currently suffer with a chronic disease (1), a figure which is set to rise with the aging population. Those with an attributable cause for their fatigue, such as chronic diseases, are unable to access NHS CFS services. Despite this, NHS services dedicated to the fatigue occurring outside CFS/ME are lacking. This leaves many people without the support and access to the multidisciplinary team that they need.

Bilateral spontaneous rectus sheath haematoma complicating dengue haemorrhagic fever: a case report.

doi:10.7244/cmj.2015.06.001
KJ Bhat MD, HJ Samoon and R Shovkat

The clinical course of dengue haemorrhagic fever in the elderly is rather atypical and it is imperative to be aware of the protean manifestations and complications of dengue febrile illness in this age group. Rectus sheath haematoma, in the context of acute emergency presentations is uncommon, especially in the patients on anti-coagulation therapy. Bilateral  rectus sheath haematoma is rarely seen.

We present the first case of spontaneous and bilateral rectus sheath haematoma complicating dengue haemorrhagic fever in an elderly male. This case emphasizes the fact that serious complications can occur during the defervescence phase, especially in the elderly, and that a high index of supervision and suspicion should be maintained by the clincians.

Pages