2015 Issue

Fatigue: let's talk about it

doi:10.7244/cmj.2015.06.002
RL Lambson

Chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) is a debilitating condition characterised by intense long-lasting fatigue and affects 0.2-2% UK population. In addition, a more significant burden to UK health is the fatigue is commonly associated with many chronic diseases. Over 17.5 million people within the UK currently suffer with a chronic disease (1), a figure which is set to rise with the aging population. Those with an attributable cause for their fatigue, such as chronic diseases, are unable to access NHS CFS services. Despite this, NHS services dedicated to the fatigue occurring outside CFS/ME are lacking. This leaves many people without the support and access to the multidisciplinary team that they need.

Bilateral spontaneous rectus sheath haematoma complicating dengue haemorrhagic fever: a case report.

doi:10.7244/cmj.2015.06.001
KJ Bhat MD, HJ Samoon and R Shovkat

The clinical course of dengue haemorrhagic fever in the elderly is rather atypical and it is imperative to be aware of the protean manifestations and complications of dengue febrile illness in this age group. Rectus sheath haematoma, in the context of acute emergency presentations is uncommon, especially in the patients on anti-coagulation therapy. Bilateral rectus sheath haematoma is rarely seen.

We present the first case of spontaneous and bilateral rectus sheath haematoma complicating dengue haemorrhagic fever in an elderly male. This case emphasizes the fact that serious complications can occur during the defervescence phase, especially in the elderly, and that a high index of supervision and suspicion should be maintained by the clincians.

Optogenetics: A vision of the future of Neurology?

doi:10.7244/cmj.2015.03.001
F Brown

In 1979, Nobel laureate Francis Crick published a paper discussing progress in neuroscience. Describing the subject as “profoundly mysterious”, he speculated on new methods of investigating the brain, including the ability to inactivate one type of neuron whilst leaving the others “more or less unaltered” [1]. Crick is not alone; for years the mammalian brain has dumbfounded researchers [1,2]. In the human, a hundred billion neuronal parts and myriad connections lead to an interconnected system of a level of unparalleled complexity [3]. This system is responsible for poetry, music and art and gives rise to consciousness, memory and countless other phenomena. It is also the victim of a vast array of devastating pathologies [4].

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