2014 Issue

Polygeia: students shaping global health

doi:10.7244/cmj.2014.12.001
R Heywood, D Neal

On 15th November a new Cambridge-based organisation, Polygeia, held their inaugural conference on global health policy. Polygeia’s mission is to empower students to participate in global health discussions through policy research and discussion. Already, work has been produced on neglected tropical diseases, mental health, global health partnerships, sexual and reproductive health and pharmaceuticals. The type of work done ranges from literature reviews to opinion pieces to project evaluations. Through undertaking a wide range of work with support from academics and professionals from around the world, the second aspect to Polygeia’s mission is to develop the skills of those students involved.

3rd EUNS National Conference 2015; From Neuroscience to Neurology

Image credit: aboutmodafinil.com

doi:10.7244/cmj.2014.11.001
R Heywood

We are happy to once again be supporting the Edinburgh University Neurological Society (EUNS) for their 3rd Annual conference, to be held on Saturday 7th February, 2015. The conference will involve keynote speakers specialising in ageing, CJD and paediatric neurosurgery, along with workshops on Surgery and Neurotrauma, Careers in Neurology and Neurosurgery, Neuroscience Lab Skills and Science Communication. There is also a poster and oral presentation session

The Future of Neurology: Announcing the winning essay of the 2014 “Neuroscience to Neurology” essay competition

Image credit: ZEISS Microscopy

doi:10.7244/cmj.2014.03.001
F Begeti

The World Health Organization estimates that neurological disorders currently affect one billion people worldwide, a number which is predicted to increase considerably as a result of an ageing population. The need to further understand the brain and make progress in the field of neurology has therefore never been greater. However, with over 100 million neurons each making over 1000 synapses, the human brain is undoubtedly the most complex organ in the human body, and it is this complexity that has meant that advances in neuroscience have been comparatively slow.

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